Gender Magick


I'm a 26 year-old genderqueer boycreature from Vermont. This Tumblr is devoted to connecting with my trans peers worldwide and also sharing my experience from beyond/between the gender binary. This is an ode to embodiments of intentional androgyny, permanent liminality, genderf*ck, chaos magic, and the subversion of oft-uncontested heteronormativity. Stay tuned and watch me sing myself into being... :) In addition to gender-related stuff, there may occasionally be content relating to spirituality/the occult, gaming, ecology, sci-fi, psytrance and other magickal things.

Aug 8

Q: What happens when two sperm fertilize one egg?

A: Semi-identical intersexed twins.

I stumbled upon this TIME article from 2007 while doing some research on fraternal twins. Fascinating!

"There are two basic twin types now, identical and fraternal, but a third type is the focus of a new discovery. The story of these one-of-a-kind twins begins after natural conception and an uncomplicated term pregnancy, when the newborns were brought to the attention of science because one is anatomically male and one has sexually ambiguous genitalia.

For the first time, researchers have identified twins that are identical on their mother’s side, but share only half of their father’s DNA. The twins, now toddlers, have been described as “semi-identical” — caught somewhere between identical twins (the result of the cleaving of an egg fertilized by one sperm) and fraternal twins (the result of two eggs meeting two sperm). Lead investigator Dr. Vivienne Souter says that while the term semi-identical provides some idea of how the twinning occurred, it is “an oversimplification.”

According to a study published in the Mar. 28 issue of Human Genetics, two sperm fertilized one egg and created the twins. The phenomenon occurs in about 1% of the population, but most embryos created in this way — called triploids because they have three sets of chromosomes — do not live. Says Dr. Mary Jane Minkin, a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Yale University: “This confirms that two sperm can get into an egg.” Normally the cell dies. But Minkin makes a valid point: “Never say never in medicine and biology.”


Read the rest here: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1603799,00.html#ixzz0w4S0q3HS


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  7. aquatictherapyperv reblogged this from saxifraga-x-urbium and added:
    Ohhhh fascinating
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  10. saxifraga-x-urbium reblogged this from genderqueer and added:
    Found this by googling after discussion where I explained to the boyfriend the difference between identical (one egg,...
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  17. bblackenedbutterfly reblogged this from genderqueer and added:
    Fuck, I was always told that once one sperm made its way into an egg, another could not make its way in.
  18. optais-amme reblogged this from genderqueer
  19. elizabeth--frances reblogged this from genderqueer and added:
    gendermagick: “The twins have different proportions of male cells (XY) and female cells (XX), and are chimeric, meaning...