Gender Magick


I'm a 26 year-old genderqueer boycreature from Vermont. This Tumblr is devoted to connecting with my trans peers worldwide and also sharing my experience from beyond/between the gender binary. This is an ode to embodiments of intentional androgyny, permanent liminality, genderf*ck, chaos magic, and the subversion of oft-uncontested heteronormativity. Stay tuned and watch me sing myself into being... :) In addition to gender-related stuff, there may occasionally be content relating to spirituality/the occult, gaming, ecology, sci-fi, psytrance and other magickal things.

Posts tagged religion

Feb 23

Feb 20
What happens when queer mystics read Susan Stryker.
Monster Jesus.
Exposition forthcoming…

What happens when queer mystics read Susan Stryker.

Monster Jesus.

Exposition forthcoming…


Feb 10

Jan 29

Reading “The Believing Brain” by Michael Shermer

For one of my classes at CGU, co-taught by Dr. Paul Zak and Michael Shermer. Two badass dudes—Shermer is the founding publisher of Skeptic magazine and is one of the scholarly authorities on the science and psychology of belief, and Dr. Zak is the founder of one of the first departments of Neuroeconomics in the country, and studies the effects of oxytocin on trust and morality. (link to his TED talk) Psyched. Blending transdisciplinary science  with the secular study of Christianity is pretty much one of my cups of tea.

One of the best quotes so far:

"Even the belief that the government can impose top-down measures to rescue the economy is a form of agenticity, with President Obama being hailed with almost messianic power as "the one" who will save us."
OMG YES, THANK YOU. This is what I’ve been sayeeeeng. To say nothing of the fact that I’ve known many people who are cynical about mainstream religion but believe in conspiracy theories. Please… check yourself.

To be more specific, I’ve met people who are cynical and downright vitriolic toward Christianity, but then they believe that aliens have been occupying the earth for thousands of years and are behind all major political power structures. Or something tamer, like they belief in astrology. Cool, fine, I mean, me too! But do they not see the hypocrisy there? The reason I study *Christianity* as opposed to the theory of the Reptilian aliens is because.. guesswhat… more people believe it and have believed it. It’s had huge effects on society and still does. I’m not even saying that they “aren’t true”… either sets of belief. That’s not for me to say. I’m not a theologian, at least not publicly.

A great example of this sort of hypocrisy is that stupid internet movie that was so popular a few years ago called “ZEITGEIST”, which was a “documentary” about religion, in particular Christianity, that suggested that Christianity was some sort conspiracy for social control, citing all the central traditions within Christian culture that were iterations of pre-christian ritual or absorbed from Norse/Anglo saxon religion. Cool, the maker of that film took a history of christianity or comparative religion class, how subversive. The tone of that film was barbed and inappropriately snarky toward Christian religion, and freshly minted atheists everywhere sung its praises. But needless to say, the fact that it even hinted at, implied, or otherwise framed with spooky music and editing, that there is some sort of planned social control occuring because of religion just struck me as pure intellectual suicide. It really was a thorn in my side for a long time, and I didn’t feel like my perceptions were corroborated by evolutionary sciences since so many of THOSE guys hate religion too!!! But Michael Shermer’s book is awesome because it focuses so much on the cognitive science of belief… ALL belief. including scientific belief. ;) Since I am no fan of an attitude of scientific imperialism, this sort of self awareness in science writing and equal treatment of all beliefs is pretty damn awesome.

Jan 24

Jan 23

fittedhash-deactivated20121121 said: What religion are you?

Good question! But I might ramble because I also study religion so I think about it a lot. :P

I like to say I’m “Christianoid”, because in terms of my acculturation I’m Protestant Christian, like most other Americans whether they like it or not, even if they are atheist. :P

I was raised going to an Unitarian church in central Vermont, which is a very liberal protestant sect that has lots of transcendentalist influence and is very interfaith and pluralistic. The grandson of Ralph Waldo Emerson actually was a lifetime member of my home church, so we really were Unitarians to the core!

When it comes to theology, especially monotheism, I consider myself agnostic (which I suspect many Unitarians are), but I also strongly identify with all forms of mystical spirituality - at least all that I have encountered, even ones that come from a monotheistic tradition. I guess I would be comfortable being called a mystical Christian, especially because I’ve found a lot of affinity in orthodox Christian spirituality (my mother is Greek and one half of my family is Greek Orthodox). Many people don’t associate the term “orthodox” with mystical, but in fact Eastern orthodox christianity can be very mystical and has a lot of similarities with the Buddhist tradition.

I appreciate all religions and strongly believe that belief itself is a powerful tool, thus I have great respect for it even though it is often wielded in what I think is an unenlightened way. I also don’t identify with or really understand the position of atheism because atheism is actually a form of postmodern theology and I think a lot of people who are atheist are actually post-theist or have some other kind of spirituality that for some reason is getting confused with atheism.

To call myself an atheist would be to participate in a useless debate, and also would locate me squarely within the mainstream protestant christian theological discourse (no thank you). It is interesting to consider, that Christians were once vitriolically called atheists, when the Jesus movement was new. Atheism just means reaction against the status quo or the predominant world view, and it is in my opinion a symptom of revolution in the Kuhnian sense (not a bad thing at all… I love me some paradigm shifts!) Maybe some people can appropriate it as a meaningful term to somehow describe the complexity of their intellects, but for me it feels like a term that hides more than it reveals.

If I could choose, I’d choose probably not a religion of the book, but rather a philosophy-religion, like Hermeticism. The three M’s, Myth, mystery and magick, are all I need to worship/follow/dance around. :)


Jan 21

Anonymous said: Hey, where does the spelling for "magick" come from?

Hi, thanks for the message. It’s a good (and interesting) question!

It’s is a variant spelling of “magic” from early modern English (technically spoken from the mid 15th-mid 17th centuries) in England. To my knowledge this spelling was revived/popularized by Aleister Crowley (late 19th century), a famous and controversial English occultist. The spelling is usually used nowadays (and by Crowley) to distinguish it from sleight-of-hand magic/stage magic. “Magick” is instead essentially a set of techniques and methods to attain a form of spiritual self-actualization or gnosis, which in many occult traditions is seen as equivalent to a holistic understanding of the self and the self’s relatedness to the natural world/environment. Crowley describes it as "the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will". The goal is essentially the “Great Work" or magnum opus, which is again a sort of secular equivalent of enlightenment, which moreover is not necessarily teleological (it doesn’t or might not have an end). Often people take it a little too literally (as testified to by the popular phrase "magical thinking") and think that occult practitioners actually believe they have or can attain fantastical powers like levitation, telekinesis or the like. However, this is not exactly right. It’s similar to the parable in the book of Matthew, when Jesus talks about how if one has enough faith, one could move mountains. The trick or paradox is that if you actually DID have faith that could "move mountains", you wouldn’t have to. Another way of putting this is, to paraphrase Peter J. Carroll, that the smallest ability to change oneself is more powerful than any ability to change the outside world.

Many misunderstand or mislabel the magick practice as satanic, selfish, or hedonistic. This is mostly because there doesn’t seem to be a particular ethical/moral framework that is universally tied to this sort of practice, so therefore it is easy to appropriate it for harmful ends, and also easy to ‘demonize’ it from any sort of position of religious orthodoxy.

Essentially magick can be understood as a form of postmodern religion, because it draws upon all the benefits and effectiveness of ritual but does not invest it with any theological meaning, or at least not in the traditional sense. The most concise example of this philosophy is in the modern occult tradition of chaos magick, for which the core tenet is simply that belief itself is a tool. All of one’s personal practice ideally derives from this central supposition and awareness about belief and how it functions, in the self and in others. Personally I am very much in solidarity with the philosophy of chaos magick, and I would also caution anyone in comparing it with pop New Age philosophies like the law of attraction from The Secret. The “truth” of magick is more subtle than that. As I once read on a magic hat bottle cap, "Truth is slippery, like eels."

I highly recommend anything by Peter J Carroll and Robert Anton Wilson if one is interested in further pursuing the subject.


Dec 5
Vishnu as Krishna his universal form, depicting his 12 avatars. I just stumbled across this while doing some research and wanted to share it because it is so beautiful and transfixing.
Off the official scholarly and politically-correct record, I wish we had spiritual iconography this profound as fixtures of our urban environments. Hindu iconography is so much more queer and pyschedelic to me, and it’s way easier to identify with.
In the Westernmost-of-the-West, we have Michelangelo’s David and blue-eyed Jesus…. DO NOT IDENTIFY WITH. And actually, religious iconography is really not at all a part of American culture and public space since that’s pretty much one of the whole points of Protestantism. *shrug* That’s why Eastern Orthodox and “Oriental” Chrisianities are so cool… they are so aesthetically ornate and full of sensory awesomeness.
I’m belying my Greek/Iconophile roots here, but I’m just a strong proponent of visual and sensory ‘aids’ to the transcendent, always. Whether mantras, yantras, visionary art, iconography, sacred space, sacramental subtances… Through the stuff of the world, the world is known.

Vishnu as Krishna his universal form, depicting his 12 avatars. I just stumbled across this while doing some research and wanted to share it because it is so beautiful and transfixing.

Off the official scholarly and politically-correct record, I wish we had spiritual iconography this profound as fixtures of our urban environments. Hindu iconography is so much more queer and pyschedelic to me, and it’s way easier to identify with.

In the Westernmost-of-the-West, we have Michelangelo’s David and blue-eyed Jesus…. DO NOT IDENTIFY WITH. And actually, religious iconography is really not at all a part of American culture and public space since that’s pretty much one of the whole points of Protestantism. *shrug* That’s why Eastern Orthodox and “Oriental” Chrisianities are so cool… they are so aesthetically ornate and full of sensory awesomeness.

I’m belying my Greek/Iconophile roots here, but I’m just a strong proponent of visual and sensory ‘aids’ to the transcendent, always. Whether mantras, yantras, visionary art, iconography, sacred space, sacramental subtances… Through the stuff of the world, the world is known.


Nov 5

Sep 16
Woah, I love these!

Woah, I love these!


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